Alcohol Units

Alcohol units are a popular measurement system invented in Great Britain to dictate healthy levels of alcoholic beverage intake for daily consumption. While the system is effective for educational purposes it lacks exacting measurements in most cases and should only be used as a guideline for those drinking alcohol brewed beverages. A pour of alcohol varies in quantity from one bar to the next so generalized measures are not an effective way to measure consumption.

In addition to quantity variations, alcohol by volume (abv) differs from one drink to the next. This is a commonly known fact as it pertains to beer versus wine or spirits; however, fewer people take the time to consider the ranges of abv from beer to beer or wine to wine. In these cases, a drinker may consume a pint of beer with an abv of four percent while another may consume one with a ten percent abv.

The exact measurement of alcohol units is defined as eight grams (ten milliliters) of pure alcohol. The typical notion is that a single alcohol unit is equal to half pint of beer, a small glass of wine or a shot of spirits. However, this system is, again, only a generalized guideline since the abv of each beverage affects how many fluid ounces it takes to reach eight grams of pure alcohol.

Alcohol units have been defined based upon the average metabolism’s ability to process one in a single hour’s time. One unit takes one hour to burn. Obviously, the size, weight and general health of people varies greatly, and this affects how quickly the body burns a strong beverage. Weight is the first classifier to determine metabolic speed. Larger people will have a greater volume of water in the body to absorb and eliminate alcohol. Heavier people may respond more to alcohol if their weight comes from fat and less if their weight comes from muscle. Fat is low in water content and slows metabolic rates. Active individuals burn alcohol more quickly than inactive persons because of having higher Basal metabolic rates.

While all of these factors affect the way individual body’s process alcohol, the unit measurement is the soundest way to determine safe drinking habits. Physicians around the world have acknowledged that a certain amount of spirited beverages should be consumed a week, never in excess of fourteen units for males or ten units a week for women. Doctors do not make a distinction for these limits based on the person’s size.

In the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada and much of Europe, laws have mandated that bottles of alcohol be labeled with a system to determine alcohol units for consumption. Safe drinking guidelines then help people to adhere to weekly limitations for healthy drinking. The United States has yet to adopt a strict unit’s method, and instead focuses on abv and less specified limitations. If a person chooses to follow healthy drinking recommendations by adhering to the alcohol units system, these beverages can be enjoyed responsibly and toasted to good health.

Alcohol units are a popular measurement system invented in Great Britain to dictate healthy levels of alcoholic beverage intake for daily consumption. While the system is effective for educational purposes it lacks exacting measurements in most cases and should only be used as a guideline for those drinking alcohol brewed beverages. A pour of alcohol varies in quantity from one bar to the next so generalized measures are not an effective way to measure consumption.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *